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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
were changing to get out of the environment and see how the war was being reported and get back in and get the story. i was traveling around with different officers. most of my time was spent traveling with general petraeus. to security areas and sitting in meetings with him in kabul. if there was not a lot of concern. that is the story reported over the year. we then fit in the biographical digressions. and what i tried to show and i pulled my dissertation were the variables that were influencing david petraeus' thinking. his social networks and his mentors. there are four mentors. holly has been a wonderful source of information. the second is keith running deal. he was -- nightingale. he helped to start the joint special operations trinity concentrate he had been involved in the hostage rescue. their letters show how he was thinking about special operations and that community which not all of people know he has that background and interest in. albeit a sort of academic interest. the third key mentor and most influential is general jack galvin. he was assigned with gen. galvin
in the environment or from whatever source, you're going to be, in my experience, not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do i"n exist, how do i deal with the problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues, and as we are welt aware, there's a lot of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge, and many in the room have been major contributors to that, and we've made great strides. it seems to me one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage advances in science and medicine to actually benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, solved, resolved by the advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us, and why i'm interested in being here, why we're participating in this, and there's still a lot of work to be done. now that you're allÑi here, noby leaves the room without signing a pledge without donating your time, effort to the clause; right? you wouldn't be here otherwise. let's talk a little bit or think
sovereign nation. and the money doesn't go to clean it up. i know mr. waxman loves the environment, so do i. but this money doesn't go for that purpose. it can be used for anything. it's not for engine technology, it's not for restoration of the environment. and it doesn't stop emissions. so this bill does represent a bipartisan, bicameral compromise. but it gives us the authority to hold their feet to the fire and get a solution. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from west virginia. mr. lahood: mr. speaker, the gentleman i am going to yield to now may be departing the congress after this session. but we will still value his professionalism, his expertise and certainly his friendship for the very near and distant future. i'm happy to yield five minutes to the gentleman from illinois, the once chairman and now ranking member of our aviation subcommittee on transportation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. >> i thank the gentleman, the running backing member, for yieldin
changing rapidly as a factor in the environment is to knowledge across the board, primarily information technology in various manifestations and that seems like a drastic reshaping, but also can have effects on where the apparent power resources, traditional kinds of nontraditional kinds. although we often highlight the potential for empowered individuals can go around and cause havoc using new technologies and new dangers and threats, there's a new bond film out. every bond film has featured some transnational nonstate actor going on with the technology causing havoc. i'm not sure how terribly new threat that is. new technologies seem to reinforce the power of existing orders. if you think of the degree to which the national ecological revolution has reenergized the north american energy markets is fundamentally reset politics towards the traditional powers in the west rather than away from them come when you think about drones in the war on terror and the degree to which technology has allowed a tight footprint that is far more effective in many respects than the specific task of gett
impacts on you. this is whole different environment and we can not let the republicans say, hey, if we could just hide this. i don't want to hear how you hide your views. i want to hear how you change your views. >> picking up on that, ann, did you see that in your research, when the message developments reach out to women you had to integrate these ideas of social and economic messages that they are part of a basket of issues that affect women's lives? >> they were part of a basket. i think what is important when we were targeting these independent voters in battleground states, these women were reacting very much to the same messages that most voters were reacting to. i think, when we're talking getting more women into the pipeline, we want to go back to the, i think the big story of this campaign, and recruiting and getting more women involved and sort of really waking up to that independent female voter votes who is becoming more conscious of these issues but also thinking of possibly running and which party they might align with. one of the things when you talk to women candidates
protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. soothes you to sleep with ingredients like melatonin. it's safe with no side effects, so you wake up... ready to go. [ male announcer ] unisom natural nights. >>> may my name's bond, james bond. >> that is moore, sir roger moore, make the eye koing british agent in "live and let die," his first movie as bond, the at a role in seven of the movies. roger, a great honor to have you in my studio. >> piers, very nice to see you again. but please, call me roger. >> i can't. americans wouldn't stand for it. now, you appeared in seven of the bond movies. >> mm-hmm. >> yet, i heard you in an interview earlier today saying that you felt "skyfall," the best bond movie ever. >> the box office proves it what i said
the journal on what improvements we see by putting teenagers in this environment. it will be printed next year. what we're seeing is a 10-15% improvement on survival rates. we're not dealing with medicine, just environment. if you had a drug that will give you 10-15% improvement on your outcome, they would throw billions at you. >> you cannot really argue with that. it sounds like a great plan. was there someone specifically? how did you become interested in teenage cancer? how did you notice there was a gap in this? >> as i said earlier, i noticed basically because my doctor and his wife noticed. i just have one of those brains that seem to me straight line, sensible things to do. there is a huge problem in madison of the moment. costs are going through the roof. there are other things you can do to improve the care of the patient. the one role of medicine that is observation of pedicethe patien. basically from the beginning when it was posed to me as a problem. >> when it was announced you were speaking here we did get questions from the general public, and some came from young adult teenage
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)